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The potentials of Nanoscience.




Nanoscience is the study of structures and materials on the scale of nanometers or Nanoscience is the study of atoms, molecules, and objects whose size is on the nanometer scale (1 - 100 nm).
The study of nanoscience involves molecules that are only 1/100th the size of cancer cells and that have the potential to profoundly improve the quality of our health and our lives. The usage of nanoscience findings are unlimited especially in the Health sector. Nanoparticles can be designed to target infectious disease. Nanomaterials may target the lungs to deliver potent antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs could fight bacterial and viral infection.
Nanoparticles may lead to more effective treatments of neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as arthritis.
The emerging field of immuno-oncology is likely to produce advances that will activate the body’s immune system to attack tumor cells. Important advantages of nanoparticles are that they can bind selectively to receptors over-expressed on tumors and may be delivered to the same cell at a predetermined dose and timing, although significant scientific challenges remain.

One of the sectors in which nanoscience can be applied is the power sector.
Nanotechnology is likely to capture, convert and store energy with greater efficiency, and will help to safely produce sustainable and efficient large-scale energy production to meet the increasing worldwide demand for energy.
Nanotechnology principles are being used in water desalination and purification, and nanotechnology is poised to make major contributions to supplying clean water globally.

Nanoscience can also be used in the communication sector. Technology is likely to become increasingly widespread, with the proliferation of “nano-enabled smart devices” in such areas as telecommunications, consumer staples and information technology.
Nanoscience has brought together scientists, engineers and clinicians from many fields, and will continue to cross many academic boundaries.

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