Dubai releases the first batch of Robotic Cop today - Premiumstech: Tech News, How-Tos, Science and Health Tips



Dubai releases the first batch of Robotic Cop today

Robotic cop
Every thousand miles begins with a step and it starts today may 24th, the police chief in the oil-rich and one of the successful cities in the world has made it clear that he would like to see robots make up 25 percent of the total police force by 2030. If this becomes a reality, it would reduce the work loads of the human police and also increase the efficiency of the police department as a whole in Dubai.
Starting from the waist up, the robotic cop looks human.

 It has two arms that end in articulating fingers, a head, and two eyes. Although, those are actually cameras that can scan a crowd for wanted individuals using facial recognition technology. As you can see from the uploaded pictures, it has a hat. The bottom half is where the limits of current technology become obvious. Instead of legs, the Dubai robot cop has wheels.
robotic corp

The Dubai police are desperate to see this function effectively in public, where it will serve mainly as a community robot. It’s not equipped to chase down suspects, but people will be able to use it to report crimes, pay fines, and ask questions. If the robot’s sensors detect someone in a crowd who is wanted by the police, it can stream video directly to officers who then do all the leg work.
robotic corp

Read Also: Meet this Chinese robot goddess that looks strikingly real and can hold a simple conversation.

The Dubai police are mostly known for their fast responsive character whenever they are called upon or when there is a break down of law and order. But this Robotic Cop may slow processes down because it might not be able to make arrest. The Robot makes it easier for police to spot those who may run afoul of the country’s laws.
robotic corp

This first robot will only be able to carry out simple orders when deployed this month. That could change as more robots are added to Dubai’s police force, and they intend to add a lot of them. That leads to the question of what level of force is appropriate when a machine can’t truly make decisions or gauge a situation. Even humans with the ability to improvise and read body language can make mistakes that escalate a situation, sometimes resulting in injury or death.

Robots could make many more mistakes, especially when programmed to uphold stringent laws. Police plan to have the robot patrol “high-density” areas of the city. While this robot will simply scan crowds, shake hands, and accept payments, future police robots in the UAE might not be so friendly.

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